Cat arthritis steroids

The most commonly used class of drugs for managing arthritic pain are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A number of different NSAIDs are licensed for use in cats in different countries, but the safety of these drugs varies, and care is especially needed when choosing a drug for long-term treatment. To minimise the risk of side-effects, the drug should be chosen carefully, and used carefully as well (using the lowest effective dose for the individual cat). For further information see: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and your cat .

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Primary care physicians such as internists, family practice doctors, and general practitioners frequently diagnose and treat common musculoskeletal conditions and straightforward cases of arthritis. Rheumatologists are specialists in the more than 100 different types of arthritis and have great expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis, from straightforward to complex cases. Orthopedists (also known as orthopedic surgeons) commonly treat arthritis, especially when surgical management is necessary. Other medical specialists who may be involved in the treatment of arthritis include physical therapists and occupational therapists.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can have noticeable, beneficial effects for the arthritis patient. However, NSAIDs that are intended for human use have a high incidence of potentially serious side effects in dogs. NSAIDs like Etogesic, Rimadyl, Metacam, and Deramaxx have been designed specifically for dogs and are much safer than drugs like ibuprofen or aspirin. However, these “doggy” NSAIDs can still cause gastrointestinal upset and in rare cases liver or kidney dysfunction. NSAID use in dogs should always be supervised by a veterinarian.

Cat arthritis steroids

cat arthritis steroids

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can have noticeable, beneficial effects for the arthritis patient. However, NSAIDs that are intended for human use have a high incidence of potentially serious side effects in dogs. NSAIDs like Etogesic, Rimadyl, Metacam, and Deramaxx have been designed specifically for dogs and are much safer than drugs like ibuprofen or aspirin. However, these “doggy” NSAIDs can still cause gastrointestinal upset and in rare cases liver or kidney dysfunction. NSAID use in dogs should always be supervised by a veterinarian.

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